Faculty Position in Applied Mathematics

Harvard University in Massachusetts

Date Posted February 10, 2014
Type Tenured, tenure track
Employment Type Full-time

Faculty Position in Applied Mathematics

 

The Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) at Harvard University seeks applicants for a position at the tenured level in the field of Applied Mathematics, with an expected start date of July 1, 2014.

 

The Applied Mathematics program benefits from outstanding undergraduate and graduate students, an excellent location, significant industrial collaboration, and substantial support from the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.  Information about the School’s current faculty, research, and educational programs is available at http://www.seas.harvard.edu/

 

Candidates are required to have a doctorate.  We are seeking candidates who have an outstanding research record and a strong commitment to undergraduate teaching and graduate training.

 

Applicants will apply on-line at http://academicpositions.harvard.edu/postings/5092.  Required documents include a cover letter, curriculum vitae, copies of up to three representative papers, a research statement, a teaching statement, and names and contact information for at least three references.  We encourage candidates to apply by December 15, 2013, but applications will be accepted until the position is filled. 

Harvard University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer.  Applications from women and minority candidates are strongly encouraged.

 

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